Congratulations!

The Brown Fellows Program “Kentucky Connections” received an education award from the Kentucky Historical Society Read more here.
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Katherine O’Nan (UofL ’18) blends chemistry, distilling into career path

Read more here.

It’s a four-year scholarship, but you never stop being a Brown Fellow.

Carmen Mitchell (U of L ’14) shows off her BFP charm bracelet before graduating with her master’s degree in public health at commencement this past weekend.
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Matt Hughes (Centre ’16) takes an anthropological look into the relationship between pilgrimage and tourism for his John C. Young project.

Read more here.
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Congratulations to Rosslyn Steinmetz (U of L ’13), winner of the Mary Churchill Humphrey Scholarship from the U of L College of Arts and Sciences.

Already a Fulbright winner (to Paraguay) in 2013, Rosslyn will spend next year studying at the London School of Economics. Read more here.image_mini

Jessica Eaton (UofL ’13) has earned a Fulbright-Fogarty Fellows and Scholars in Public Health award to Lilongwe, Malawi

Read more here.

Qinpu He ’16 focuses John C. Young research on brain-computer interface

Read more here.

Matt Hughes (Centre ’16) on being named the SAA men’s lacrosse Offensive Player of the Week!

Read more here.

Lola Fakunle (Centre ’18) is “Exploring Concussions” through Undergraduate Research.

Read more here.

Jonathan Ryan Hunt (Centre ’15), was recently awarded a NSF Graduate Research Grant!

Big congratulations to Jonathan Ryan Hunt (Centre ’15), who was recently awarded a NSF Graduate Research Grant!

He states, “my research proposal detailed efforts to create, through both experimental and theoretical means, a catalog of molecules detailing the effects of those molecules when used in the surface functionalization of hematite. Hematite is basically rust, but it actually shows great promise as a photoanode for water splitting (production of hydrogen and oxygen gas) in the next generation of solar cells. That’s of course great because rust is cheap and plentiful, but currently it’s not quite cutting it. Research has been done in attempts to improve its utilization in solar cells via various surface functionalizations, but I took this a step further in my proposal by increasing the breadth and depth of the topic. Our lab (under Dr. Jahan Dawlaty) has a unique combination of resources that would allow me to pursue this breadth and depth.”

He further states, “my personal statement did involve a discussion of Appalachia and the Brown Fellows Program. The hope to return and play an active role in increasing the educational opportunities of those in Kentucky played a prominent role, as did the hope to lead an initiative to displace coal as a major energy resource while providing comparable or better economic resources to affected communities [after all, you can find rust anywhere!].”
Read more here.